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The umpire’s disagreement raised its head in the dog’s win over Pais as Jordan de Goi received a ridiculous penalty.

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AFL fans and pundits have criticized the decision of the umpires to give Collingwood star Jordan de Goye a 50-meter penalty on Friday night for disagreement, even as the star tried to quell his frustration.

Trying to get the game and the legs back on the line, De Goey pulled a whistle to push back which looked like a legitimate tackle.

De Goey threw his hands out in frustration, but then quickly pushed them back inside because he consciously felt that the action was now classified as dissent.

Despite his repeated appeals, De Goye still faced a 50-meter penalty which was very impressive in terms of the game.

Both De Goye and Bulldogs player Buku Khamis conceded a controversial 50-meter penalty in the game and Matthew Richardson was disgusted in the commentary.

‘Come out of it. That’s not 50 meters, ‘he said in a commentary for Seven.

‘Then you have to pay them all. It’s just ridiculous.

‘Sometimes I feel for them. This is an emotional game. They are not robots. ‘

De Goi was left confused and frustrated by a series of calls against him. It could easily go the other way, with the lead for a Collingwood free kick instead of a tackle

Speaking in Fox SportsFormer champion full-forward Jason Dunstall said there should be generosity with events like De Goi, where he felt he reacted to the rules violation and tried to put his hands down immediately.

Dunstall said, ‘I thought De Goy was a bit tough because he was about to go out and then literally got inside himself and actually stopped but you can see at first that he was going to take up arms,’ Dunstall said.

‘If you’re going to put a lot of effort into pulling yourself back, I think you deserve to get a little bit of Latitude.

‘It’s really, really hard where it is.’

St Kilda Great Leh Montagna agreed and questioned why two 50-meter calls were made on Friday night after none had been released long ago.

“That’s what we want to see from the players – restraint – and he brought it back to himself. He did what we wanted with this rule and still paid 50,” he said.

“We haven’t seen them pay for five weeks, so it’s an illusion. Why all of a sudden There was a big focus after round three, then it went away. ‘

Fans were quick to defend De Goi, too, saying large fines should only be rolled out for actual acts of dissent.

“There was no real disagreement, only frustration. Not even last night. Punish them for the real disagreement, it’s not a small thing, ‘Graham Hollett tweeted.

‘There is a difference between politeness and despair! There should be decent pay, frustration or emotion in the heat of battle is completely different and not all players should be removed from the game before turning into robots, ‘Neville Clark agreed.

A Twitter pundit named Steve said the calls were affecting the spectacle of the game: ‘Last night both were stunned. As the AFL draws fans away, some of these rules need to be strictly adhered to. That day Goe killed the vibe of the game last night. The crowd lost interest, ‘he tweeted.

A Twitter pundit named Steve said the calls were affecting the spectacle of the game: ‘Last night both were stunned. As the AFL draws fans away, some of these rules need to be strictly adhered to. That day Goe killed the vibe of the game last night. The crowd lost interest, ‘he tweeted.

‘The AFL has been umpiring [a] Fun! How did that umpire abuse? Don’t protect the insecure Brad Scott that you did it wrong and fix it, ’Kevin Baker tweeted.

“It’s a big mess. Get rid of it. I’m all for it.” But showing any kind of emotion, it has become a three-ring circus. How did Brad Scott play on earth in his time, when he was such a passionate player? ‘ Tracy Reed asked.

Dunstall warned that it was important for fans and players not to blame the umpires, as they were instructed by the AFL.

“They are instructing the umpires so let’s not be strict with them. “If you look at the weapons going up, it’s a form of disagreement, but it’s hard to expect players to stop feeling emotionally as soon as the whistle blows,” he said.

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